Did We Say Top 100? We Meant 50.

So, after more than a year of planning this project, playing and writing about Genesis games, declaring that we had determined the Top 100 Genesis Games and then actually writing the several of the first entries of our countdown and even publishing the first one, we’ve decided to undergo a major change in format.  Instead of doing a Top 100 list as originally planned, we’re going to make it a Top 50.

Our reason for making this change is that, quite simply, we kind of ran into the Top 100 before we ran out of games that we didn’t really like.

When we first began this project, we had a lot of experience playing Genesis games, but hadn’t come anywhere close to playing every title available on the system.  We looked over the list of games made for it, fell back on our knowledge of the ones that we had played, read up on some of the ones we hadn’t, and made the assumption that there had to be AT LEAST 100 really great games for the system.  We then eliminated 600+ of those games to come up with our list of 100 games.  And then we realized that a lot of the games that survived this process, while better than the ones that hadn’t, weren’t really that great.  Don’t get me wrong, none of the games that would have made our Top 100 were bad.  In fact, many of them were pretty good.  But probably only half of them were great.

The problem became more and more apparent as we began writing entries for the countdown.  Obviously, we’ve come at this project with the approach of being critical of every game for two reasons.  The primary reason was for comedy – picking on games tends to lend itself to humor better than raining praise on them.  The second reason was more practical.  Our methodology relies on process of elimination, which means finding flaws, picking on the weakest titles on the list, and removing them from competition.  We intend to keep the same overly critical tone throughout the entire project, all the way down to our entry for the #1 game, but there does come a point where we should be capable of describing the game with something other than unrelenting scorn.  To put it another way, “This game sucks less than most of the other games on the Genesis” isn’t a very compelling reason to put it on any kind of list.  When I wrote the entry for what would have been game #99, I mentioned that it’s inclusion in the Top 100 made a pretty good case for why we should have made a shorter list.  When I found myself making a similar observation game #90, it started to seem less like a joke and more like something to be seriously considered.  Eventually, it was.

Don’t assume that this is a clever guise to suddenly become lazy.  True, we will be counting down half as many titles onto our list as we originally planned.  But now we also have to write another 50 elimination entries.  So it all comes out even.

To put it another way:  Upon further review, we’ve decided that there are actually only 50 Genesis games worthy of keeping their Sega Seal of Quality.  Let the revocations continue.

Did We Say Top 100? We Meant 50.
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Our reason for making this change is that, quite simply, we kind of ran into the Top 100 before we ran out of games that we didn’t really like.
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The problem became more and more apparent as we began writing entries for the countdown. Obviously, we’ve come at this project with the approach of being critical of every game for two reasons. The pirmary reason was for comedy – picking on games tends to lend itself to humor better than raining praise on them. The second reason was more practical. Our methodology relies on process of elimination, which means finding flaws, picking on the weakest titles on the list, and removing them from competition. We intend to keep the same overly critical tone throughout the entire project, all the way down to our entry for the #1 game, but there does come a point where we should be capable of describing the game with something other than unrelenting scorn. To put it another way, “This game sucks less than most of the other games on the Genesis” isn’t a very compelling reason to put it on any kind of list. When I wrote the entry for what would have been game #99, I mentioned that it’s inclusion in the Top 100 made a pretty good case for why we should have made a shorter list. When I found myself making a similar observation game #90, it started to seem less like a joke and more like something to be seriously considered. Eventually, it was.
Don’t assume that this is a clever guise to suddenly become lazy. True, we will be counting down half as many titles onto our list as we originally planned. But now we also have to write another 50 elimination entries. So it all comes out even.
To put it another way: Upon further review, we’ve decided that there are actually only 50 Genesis games worthy of keeping their Sega Seal of Quality. Better late than never.
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